Displaying items by tag: rosie garland - Rosie Garland

Hebden Bridge Arts Festival – theatre event and reading from The Palace of Curiosities

Date: Saturday 29 June
Time: 5pm
Venue: The Birchcliffe Centre,
Birchcliffe Road,
Hebden Bridge, HX7 8DG

Cost: £8 (£6) To book advance tickets, click the link below

Roll up! Listen to poet Rosie Garland read from her bewitching first novel. Marvel at the delights of a Victorian fairground curiosity sideshow!

Event website and to book tickets - click this link

Published in Gig List

Hebden Bridge Arts Festival – creative writing workshop

Date: Saturday 29 June
Time: 11am-1pm
Venue: Upstairs at The Birchcliffe Centre,
Birchcliffe Road,
Hebden Bridge, HX7 8DG
Cost: Free but BOOK IN ADVANCE (20 places) - click the link below

Suitable for 12+

Ok, so you've already read out your poetry on stage... or you are getting up the courage to do so... but how can you make it (even more) memorable?

This workshop uses practical techniques to help you make your mark on stage. Expert advice from our top performance poet on performing and staging your work.

To reserve a free place - click here for information

Published in Gig List

Don't Get it Right – Get it Written!

Date - Friday 28th June 2013
Time - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Venue - World Peace Cafe,
76 High Lane
Manchester M21 9XF

A free writing workshop facilitated by Rosie Garland, suitable for new and experienced writers who want to get their creative caffeine flowing. There'll be time for discussion as well as exercises to stimulate writing.

Rosie will also talk about how she wrote her Victorian era debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities, as well as leading participants through a series of practical workshops to generate new writing.

http://www.chorltoncoffeefestival.com/events/dont-get-it-right-get-it-written/

About Rosie

Born in London to a runaway teenager, Rosie has always been a cuckoo in the nest. She is an eclectic writer and performer, ranging from singing in cult gothic band The March Violets, to twisted alter-ego Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. She has five solo collections of poetry and is winner of the DaDa Award for Performance Artist of the Year and a Poetry Award from the People's Café, New York. Her novel 'The Palace of Curiosities' has just been published by HarperCollins.

www.rosiegarland.com

"The Palace of Curiosities is a jewel-box of a novel, with page after page, scene after scene, layer after layer of treats and surprises. Garland is a real literary talent: definitely an author to watch." Sarah Waters

Published in Gig List

An Evening Of Curiosities With Rosie Garland Supported By Stirred Poets.

Date - Thursday 27 June 2013
Time - 20:00 - 21:30
Venue - The Albert Club,
39-41 Old Lansdowne Road,
Manchester, M20 2PA
Tickets - £3 on the door

Born in London to a runaway teenager, Rosie has always been a cuckoo in the nest. She is an eclectic writer and performer, ranging from singing in cult gothic band The March Violets to twisted alter-ego Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. She has five solo collections of poetry and is winner of the DaDa Award for Performance Artist of the Year and a Poetry Award from the People's Café, New York. Her novel 'The Palace of Curiosities' has just been published by HarperCollins. Joining Rosie will be the finest feminist writers Manchester has to offer - Stirred Poetry. We will be treated to readings, open mic, Q&A, mystery guests and more!

For event website - click this link

"The Palace of Curiosities is a jewel-box of a novel, with page after page, scene after scene, layer after layer of treats and surprises. Garland is a real literary talent: definitely an author to watch." Sarah Waters

'An alternately brutal and beautiful story about love andand belonging in a vividly conveyed underworld, rich in carny phantasmagoria and lyrical romance.' The Metro

'Garland's lush prose is always a pleasure.' The Guardian

'Hugely entertaining, tough-talking ... a celebration of female sexuality, of power and liberation.'

Carol Ann Duffy

Published in Gig List

'Try Reading Someone New' event

Rosie Garland is well known as a poet and performer. Her first published novel set in 1850s London, is the story of Eve and Abel; both freaks of nature searching for escape. It explores what it's like to be different, and traces their struggle for self-discovery on the boundaries of what is perceived as human.

Date - Tue 25 Jun 2013 7pm
Venue - Altrincham Library
20 Stamford New Road,
Altrincham, WA14 1EJ

Price - Tickets free with charge for light refreshments

Suitable for - Adult

For event website - click this link

Published in Gig List
The Verb - BBC Radio 3

Date – 21th June 2013

Time – 22.00 – 22.45

  • Tune in to 90-93 FM
  • Rosie presents her new short story, commissioned for BBC Radio 3 The Verb's season of Mid-Life Fairy Tales.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01qwhv8

BBC Radio 3: the week's schedule - click this link

Published in Gig List

The People's Cafe this Saturday! Featuring Rosie Garland and openstage!

Share your words

Saturday 8 Jun, 7-9 pm.

Bayanihan Community Center, 40-21 69 Street, Woodside, Queens, NY

$3

http://www.survivorspoetry.org/the-network/new-york/

Published in Gig List

Mike Geffner Presents The Inspired Word.

The Organic Open Mic

  • Where: Bareburger (East Village)
  • http://www.bareburger.com/
  • 2nd Floor
  • 85 Second Avenue (@ 5th Street)
  • Manhattan, New York
  • (212) 510-8610
  • Date; Tuesday 11th June
  • Show starts @ 7pm
  • Cover charge: $10 (@ the door or in advance)

One of the hottest open mics in the country - featured on MTV's Washington Heights and the Travel Channel's Hidden City!

The Organic Open Mic at the gorgeous Bareburger organic restaurant in downtown Manhattan's East Village. Produced by the long-running Inspired Word open mic series, which has featured Grammy winners, American Idol finalists, Golden Globe Award winners, Emmy nominated actors, and HBO Def Poetry stars, this open mic is open to ALL types of performing artists - comedians, musicians, storytellers, singers, poets, fiction/nonfiction writers, playwrights, spoken word artists, performance artists, dancers.

The event takes place on the second floor, with full-length windows on all sides that offers an especially beautiful view.

http://inspiredwordnyc.com/

Published in Gig List
Sunday, 19 May 2013 09:12

19.5.2013 - New blog interviews!

Two new blog interviews / reviews about the launch of The Palace of Curiosities – and how long it's taken to get here.

First up: Tim Diggles - Legend – Rosie Garland (aka Rosie Lugosi)

‘What has always amazed me is that you have so many different aspects to your work. You write in your name Rosie Garland; you write and perform as your alter-ego Rosie Lugosi; you are the lead singer of The March Violets; you are a Goth icon; a legend in the world of burlesque; star of Woman’s Hour and women’s magazines; are there any other facets we don’t know about?’

Read the full interview here - click this link

Next up: Yatterings - More than a sideshow – Rosie Garland's The Palace of Curiosities.
  • 'An assured and magical novel. Her poetic output provides the writing's lyricism and her involvement in cabaret and Goth gives her an eye for the strange.'

Read the full interview here - click this link

Published in News

Blimey! I'm being used as the poster girl for next week's (sold out) Literary Death Match event The Hospital Club in Covent Garden.

This event is sold out but you can sign up for the waitlist - as tickets become available you will be contacted:

Waiting List

Here's the lineup of THE READERS

  • * Rosie Garland, the debut author of The Palace of Curiosities
  • * James Benmore, author of Dodger
  • * A.L. Kennedy, actor, writer, comedian
  • * Peter Rosengard, record-breaking life insurance salesman, founder of The Comedy Store

Literary Death Match London - link

Published in News

News and Events

  • 10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today
    10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today

    I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

    Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

    She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

    The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

    The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

    Written on Wednesday, 14 August 2019 08:44
  • 20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    Peterloo – massacre or riot?

    On June 20th 2019, The John Rylands Library staged a live performance event to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre. It was a first for the library and I was excited to take the part of Jemima Bamford – one of the thousands of men, women and children who gathered at St Peter’s Field in August 1819. I donned bonnet and shawl and created a speech, imagining how she might have spoken out against the actions of the militia, who charged into an unarmed crowd, and murdered up to 23 people.

    Then joined by 5 other actors, I took part in a public debate as we decide: was Peterloo a massacre or a riot? At the end of the debate, votes were cast, and Manchester decided overwhelmingly – massacre.

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:32
  • 8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate at Wave-Gotik Treffen

    The high point of WGT 2019 was being invited to be guest vocalist with The Bellwether Syndicate from Chicago! Rocking out to a special rendition of The March Violets track ‘Snake Dance’…
    The gig on Saturday 8th June 2019 at Taubchenthal, Leipzig was packed out – and what a crowd…

    A great pleasure to work with William Faith, Sarah Rose (aka Scary Lady Sarah), keyboards Phil Destefano, bassist Paul Sin & drummer extraordinaire Stevyn Grey

    https://www.wave-gotik-treffen.de/ro/go4it.php?id=197&loc=en

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:20
  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36