Displaying items by tag: historical fiction - Rosie Garland

What great news – encouraging, too!
My flash fiction “How can a woman sleep when the Master is in pain?” has just received a commendation in the Bath Flash Fiction Award, October 2018.
Judged by Nuala O’Connor. I’m delighted.

You can read it here:

https://bathflashfictionaward.com/2018/10/rosie-garland-october-2018-commended/

Published in News
Manchester Histories Festival launch

Manchester City Art Gallery,
Mosley Street,
Manchester M2 3JL
Free event – 6-9pm

Celebrate the launch of the 2018 Manchester Histories Festival with us. Meet the festival team and volunteers and discover what’s on over the weekend in more detail. Throughout the galleries hear protest poetry and trailblazers of our Soapbox project, drop into our Debate Café, catch Thinking Out Loud: Speech Acts talk.

Includes Rosie Garland reading her piece ‘Syrinx’ right next to the painting that inspired it.

See the full festival programme at

https://manchesterhistories.co.uk

Published in Gig List

3rd May 2018 - Very excited to announce paperback publication day of The Night Brother!
With a superb new cover.

Published in Gig List

Huge thanks to Kaite Welsh, Books Editor at Diva Magazine for this superb review of The Night Brother!
Here’s the full text of the review…

Diva review October 2017

"A must for anyone missing Sarah Waters’ foray into the Victorian era, siblings Edie and Gnome explore the delights of 19th century Manchester in Rosie Garland’s third novel - he during the night, her during the day. The prose is lush and vivid as gender fluidity mingles with magical realism. Edie grows increasingly jealous of her brother’s freedom and exhausted by her double life and the restrictions society places upon her. In The Night Brother, Garland crafts a study in dualism that would make Henry Jekyll jealous, and establishes herself as one of Britain’s best new historical novelists."

Kaite Welsh

http://www.divamag.co.uk/

Published in News
Rosie Garland: 'The Night Brother' - Reading and Book Signing

Location: John Rylands Library Historic Reading Room,
Deansgate,
Manchester M3 3EH
6-7pm
Free event

Introduced and chaired by Dr Xavier Aldana Reyes (Manchester Met).

Tagged ‘literary hero’ by The Skinny, Rosie Garland is an award-winning poet, novelist and singer with post-punk band The March Violets. With a passion for language nurtured by libraries, she started out in spoken word, garnering praise from Apples and Snakes as ‘one of the country’s finest performance poets’.
She is the author of Vixen, a Green Carnation Prize nominee. Debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities, won Book of the Year in the Co-op Respect Awards 2013 and was nominated for both The Desmond Elliott and the Polari First Book Prizes. Her latest novel The Night Brother (Borough Press) was reviewed in The Times as "A rich and ambitious tale set in late Victorian Manchester... Garland's prose is a delight: playful and exuberant. There are shades of Angela Carter in the mad world she creates... Full marks.'

Her most recent poetry collection, As In Judy, is out with Flapjack Press. She is half of The Time-Travelling Suffragettes. #gothfest17

https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/artshumanities/rah/gothic-manchester-festival/detail/index.php?id=6561

Published in Gig List
Fluid Love

Rosie Garland & Jess Richards
Sun 27 Aug 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Writers' Retreat,
Charlotte Square Gardens,
Edinburgh, EH2 4HQ
£8.00, £6.00

Set in 19th-century Manchester, writer and performance poet Rosie Garland's The Night Brother takes the reader to the outer limits of gender fluidity as it explores the complex nature of identity through siblings Edie and Gnome. Acclaimed author Jess Richards's City of Circles is the magical tale of a love affair between two circus performers, Danu and Morrie. Contemporary fiction at its finest.

The Festival's home, the beautiful, leafy Charlotte Square Gardens (at the west end of George Street, a minute's walk away from Princes Street), is a wonderful space in which to sit, talk, think, play and be entertained. Our tented village is expanding out to George Street this year with two new venues and seating areas so there are even more opportunities to relax and be entertained. You can see a favourite author, join in a workshop or debate, enjoy a cuppa in the café, a beer, or simply park yourself on the grass (with or without a book) and soak up the atmosphere.

https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/rosie-garland-jess-richards-10252

Published in Gig List
The Books Tent

Wilderness Festival,
Cornbury Park
Oxfordshire

Our Books Tent is entirely devoted to the literary arts. Ink-slinging, scribing, musing, brain-storming, spinning-yarns, telling tales. Expect takeovers from major publishers, talks and debates with incredible writers, masterclasses on writing from inspirational people, workshops, poetry, readings and a rapt audience of fellow lovers of the written word. Heaven.

Our participating publishers include Harper Collins – who are bringing Gail Honeyman, Jack Cooke, CJ Cooke and Rosie Garland to Wilderness Festival.

https://www.wildernessfestival.com/programme/the-literary-tent/
https://www.wildernessfestival.com/2017-programme/

Published in Gig List
Friday, 09 June 2017 11:39

27.6.2017 - WordFest, Trafford

Wordfest 2017

An evening with Rosie Garland
Stretford Library,
Bennett Street
Stretford
M32 8AP
Tuesday 27 June, 7.30pm

Free event – All are welcome to come to the events but booking is recommended.
Join us for an evening with author Rosie Garland as she talks about her new novel, The Night Brother.

From the author of The Palace of Curiosities and Vixen comes a dazzling and provocative new novel of adventure, mystery and belonging. Set in late-nineteenth century Manchester, The Night Brother tells the story of twins, Edie and Gnome, who share a body. They bicker, banter, shout and scream their way through the city’s streets, embracing its charms and dangers. But as the pair mature, Gnome revels in the night-time, while Edie is confined to the day.

The Night Brother is a tale of suffrage, gender equality and fluidity and also a brilliant and evocative depiction of Victorian Manchester.

This is a free Wordfest event. Book online at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/rosie-garland-tickets-32782078078?utm_term=eventurl_text

phone 0161 912 3189 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

http://www.trafford.gov.uk/residents/leisure-and-lifestyle/libraries/wordfest-events.aspx

Published in Gig List

Absolutely delighted – ‘The Night Brother’ has received good reviews in both The Times and The Sunday Times!

“The Night Brother by Rosie Garland is a rich and ambitious tale set in late Victorian Manchester… Garland’s prose is a delight: playful and exuberant. There are shades of Angela Carter in the mad world she creates... Full marks for style”.

Toni Senior 3rd June 2017
Full review here:
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/historical-fiction-w09l76frb

“Echoes of Angela Carter’s more fantastical fiction reverberate through this exuberant tale… Garland’s narrative is enjoyably energetic.”
Nick Rennison 18th June 2017

Full review here:
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/books-fiction-at-a-glance-all-the-good-things-by-clare-fisher-the-answers-by-catherine-lacey-the-night-brother-by-rosie-garland-splash-by-stephen-glover-the-idiot-by-elif-batuman-gkbbb3852

 

 

Published in News
The Night Brother – publication day 1st June 2017

Heartfelt thanks to everyone who packed out Waterstones, Deansgate, Manchester for the sold-out launch of ‘The Night Brother’!
It was a wonderful evening for my new novel, dedicated:

‘To Manchester
and all the wanderers
who have found a home in this Rainy City’

You can order it here…
https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-night-brother/rosie-garland/9780008166106

Published in News
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News and Events

  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36
  • January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    Great to start the new year with a slew of short fiction highlights!

    My story ‘Burning Girl’ is in the ‘Disturbing the Beast’ anthology from Boudicca Press, out February 2019.

    My flash fic, ‘Your sons & your daughters are beyond’ is being published in Longleaf Review on Feb 10th 2019 http://longleafreview.com/

    … flash fic ‘What goes on in the bushes’ is featured in issue 16 of The Cabinet of Heed, mid-January 2019
    https://cabinetofheed.com/

    I’ve been
    Longlisted in TSS flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.theshortstory.co.uk/flash-fiction-400/flash-fiction-results/
    &
    Longlisted in Reflex flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.reflexfiction.com/flash-fiction-contest-schedule/

    Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 14:20
  • 1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem
    1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem

    What an adventure!
    On Saturday December 1st, I sang the Pankhurst Anthem – specially written by Helen Pankhurst & Lucy Pankhurst - in Etihad Stadium in front of the Manchester City crowd at half time!

    I can honestly say I've never sung in front of a crown of 50,000 people. What an experience.

    All part of the run-up to the unveiling of Hazel Reeves wonderful statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in St Peter’s Square, Manchester on December 14th 2018.

    Written on Friday, 07 December 2018 11:01
  • November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence
    November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence

    Finally, I can announce that I am inaugural Writer-in-Residence at The John Rylands Library in Manchester. It’s fantastic news.
    How? I put together a proposal, & asked. The power of asking, indeed.

    Read the article in the University of Manchester magazine, here:

    “When I first moved to Manchester I was stunned to discover this incredible library with such a surprising history,” remembers Rosie Garland, singer with Leeds post-punk band The March Violets and writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library.
    “It’s always been one of my favourite places in Manchester and the idea that I’m now working in it and writing about it as the Library’s first writer-in- residence is a dream come true.”

    Read full article here
    https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/magazine/features/novel-library-research/

    Written on Monday, 12 November 2018 10:43